SESSIONS

REGISTRATION OPENS 08.00 / EVENT BEGINS 09.00
All live sessions will now take place in the Fox 4 lecture theatre. 

 
 

ROUNDTABLE
Fox 4 Lecture Theatre
16.00–17.00

Dr. Alice Twemlow
presents on graphic design research. Followed by a final roundtable discussion.
 
 
 
Dr. Alice TWEmlow
SVA, New York.
 
Alice Twemlow is founding chair of the Department of Design Research, Writing & Criticism at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. She recently moved to Amsterdam where she is a instructor on the Design Cultures MA at VU University Amsterdam and on the MA in Design Curating and Writing at Design Academy Eindhoven. She writes about design, and has recently contributed essays to Iconic Designs: 50 Stories about 50 Things (Berg, 2014) Lolita—Story of a Cover Girl: Vladimir Nabokov’s Novel in Art –Ω Design (Print, 2013) and The Aspen Complex (Sternberg Press, 2012). She has directed numerous design conferences, and frequently moderates and presents at seminars and conferences, including AIGA Design Educators Conferences, and the MOMA R&D Salon Series.
 
Alice has an MA and a Ph.D from the RCA/V&A Museum History of Design program in London and is currently developing her doctoral thesis about the history of design criticism into a book to be published by MIT Press. Her research interests include: the intersection of literature and design; the ways graphic design is used and read; design criticism; the social behaviours, infrastructures, and economies that shape and gather around trash and its disposal; and design for self-destruction, de-activation, and accelerated decomposition.
 

TEA

COFFEE

LUNCH

Session 4
RESEARCH INTO TEACHING
Fox 4 Lecture Theatre
14.30–15.45

Moderator
Bryan Clark
Speakers
Nicola Salkeld and Ashley Rudolph
Dr. Joanna Choukeir
 
 
 
How can we find ways to combine graphic design research research with our own teaching? How do we demonstrate the value of design research in practice-led projects? How to negotiate curriculum structures and form a workable research group? How do we make projects “live” whilst leading ideas through research? Examples of teaching research projects which successfully combine academic research interests within the curriculum.
 
 
Nicola Salkeld and Ashley Rudolph
Falmouth University/ Moth.
 
Nikki Salkeld and Ashley Rudolph both studied Graphic Design at St Martins School of Art and later worked together at UAL. Their research project MOTH initially grew out of joint interests in collections and in particular Cabinets of Curiosity as vehicles to engage with text/image/objects.
 
Death and design is the central theme to MOTH with all of the projects embedded in collaborative practice with staff and students. Through the discipline of Graphic Design, it explores visual language associated with death issues and end of life experiences. Visual ‘toolkits’ (analogue and digital) are created as devices for change in attitudes, conventions and context surrounding death issues.
 
The latest project, In The Face of Death, is a collaborative project with partners and students at Augsburg University. 
 

Dr. Joanna Choukeir
University of the Arts London and Kingston University. 

Joanna Choukeir is the Chief Operating Officer and Head of Design and Innovation at Uscreates, a London-based design consultancy with a focus on improving health and wellbeing. She recently completed her PhD on social design. Her practice-led research developed a collaborative and interdisciplinary methodology for applying communication design methods to integrate societies in post-conflict contexts. The research focuses on the case study of youth in Lebanon. Joanna is a speaker and writer on the role of design in addressing social challenges.
 

BRYAN CLARK
Falmouth University
 
Bryan Clark leads the subject of Graphic Design at Falmouth and is responsible for the undergraduate degree and future strategic developments of postgraduate study and research in the subject.
 
His creative work across branding, packaging and print design has been internationally recognised through publication, exhibition and award. These national and global accolades include D&AD Silver, New York festivals, BBC Design Awards, Design Week, Eurobest and Mobius to name but a few.
 
Bryan recently completed a role as Trustee and Director of D&AD and has judged award schemes at professional and student levels, and for the Art Directors Club of Europe in 2013. He has worked with government and cultural organisations as board member and consultant, including the Design Council and the British Council. His work has been shown at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Saatchi Gallery and the Design Museum London and he is a regular contributor to journals and creative publications.
 
Bryan is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts
    
 

 
 
Session 1
PEER REVIEW AND THE REF
Fox 4 Lecture Theatre
09.30–10.45
 

Moderator
Dr. Jessica Jenkins
Speakers
Prof. Jeremy Aynsley
Prof. Deborah Sugg Ryan

 

 
How does the REF qualify  peer review in the case of graphic design? How do we negotiate the REF process for both practice, history and theory of graphic design?  How do we align individual research to “research clusters”? New issues for the next 2020 REF round.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Prof. Jeremy Aynsley
University of Brighton.
 
Jeremy Aynsley was Director of Research at the Royal College of Art, where he was responsible for the College’s strategic development of research including the submission to the Research Excellence Framework 2014, before joining the University of Brighton as Professor of History of Design in January 2014. His research interests focus largely on the history of graphic design with an emphasis on Modernism and its legacies. He is the author of Designing Modern Germany,  A Century of Graphic Design, Graphic Design in Germany and Nationalism and Internationalism in Design in the 20th Century. Jeremy has taught numerous MA students on the V&A/RCA programme in History of Design, and has overseen the successful completion of sixteen PhD and four MPhil studentships. He is the current chair of the Design History Society. 
 
 
Prof. Deborah Sugg Ryan
Falmouth University
 
Deborah Sugg Ryan is Associate Professor of History and Theory of Design in the Fashion and Textiles Institute at Falmouth University. She started her lecturing  career in 1990 at Central Saint Martins and subsequently at the universities of Wolverhampton, East London, Ulster and Loughborough, and the Open University, joining Falmouth in 2007. She is passionate about equality and diversity in higher education and mentoring as a tool to develop academic careers. She is a member of the AHRC Peer Review College and regularly peer reviews for academic journals and publishers. Deborah’s research focuses on consumption, everyday life and domestic design. Her book 'Ideal' Homes: Design, Architecture and Suburban Modernity in England, 1918-39 will be published by Manchester University Press in 2016. She has also written on historical pageantry.
 
 
DR. JESSICA JENKINS
Falmouth University
 
Jessica Jenkins is a design historian, writer and practitioner. Her illustration and poster work has been exhibited widely and is held in the Akademie der Kunste, Berlin and the Kunstgewerbe Museum, Hamburg. As senior designer at Minale Design Strategy in Paris for six years, she designed identities for many international financial institutions, media groups and retailers. She worked in exhibition design with cw&ra on the Bauhaus retrospective at Martin Gropius Bau, Berlin and MoMa, and the Andy Warhol exhibition at the Hayward.
 
Writing for Eye magazine and blog over a number of  years, she turned to design history in 2009: her research specialism is the art and design of public spaces in socialist East Germany, and she was awarded a PhD from the RCA/V&A London in 2015. Jessica's  papers relating to her doctoral research have been published in Design Issues and The Journal of Architectural Theory and she has spoken on the topic at many international conferences. She has taught graphic design, interactive design and design history and theory  in the UK, Berlin and Cairo. This last kindled an interest in Arabic typography.
Session 2
CONNECTING WITH AUDIENCES
DISSEMINATING RESEARCH

Fox 4 Lecture Theatre
11.00–12.15
 
Moderator
Dr. Alice Twemlow
Speakers
Dr. Rebecca Ross
Craig Oldham
 
 
How can we find original ways to connect with new audiences through graphic design research? Who do we wish to address? Is it important to make connections with graphic design as a professional practice? 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dr. Rebecca Ross
Central Saint Martins, London.
 
Rebecca Ross experiments, as a conventional humanities researcher and as a designer, with the ways in which images, media, and data, are actively intertwined with conditions in neighborhoods and cities. Her current projects include, London is Changing, which was displayed on digital billboards around Central London during February and March 2015, and an article on the history of the postcode in London. Additionally, she edits the Urban Pamphleteer (with Ben Campkin), is an advisor to the UCL Urban Laboratory, and works on a consultancy basis with Camden Council. She holds a PhD in Architectural and Urban History from Harvard (2012) and an MFA in Graphic Design from Yale (2002).  .
 
 
Craig Oldham
The Office Of Craig Oldham
 
Craig Oldham has worked with various clients in a range of sectors including notably Microsoft, Nokia, Manchester City F.C., Chester Zoo, Creative Review and the re-brand of the BRIT Awards with Vivienne Westwood in 2011. 
 
He has been profiled in Grafik magazine and Design Week, has won numerous awards including D&AD, Design Week Awards, Roses, Art Directors Club, Type Directors Club, New York Festivals, Creative Review Annual, and has contributed articles for Creative Review, Grafik magazine, Eye magazine, Baseline magazine, IDEA magazine, and Design Week.
 
Craig has published several books including The Democratic Lecture, which was named as one of the best 50 design books of 2013, and In Loving Memory of Work (2015) on the UK miners’ strike of 1984-85, described as “absolutely magnificent” by The Guardian, “really powerful and very moving” by the V&A, and as “a passionate and impressive reflection of a disturbing moment in British history” by Director of the Design Museum, Deyan Sudjic.
 
Session 3
PUBLISHING GRAPHIC DESIGN
Fox 4 Lecture Theatre
13.15–14.30
 
 
Moderator
Prof. Timothy Donaldson
Speakers
John L. Walters
Dr. Rathna Ramanathan
 
 
What is the special relationship between graphic design and publishing? What forms can design research take as publishable objects in the new publishing landscape? Does the graphic design press provide a good platform for research? How can we build better relationships between the professional design press and university teaching and research?
 
 
 
 
JOHN L. WALTErs
Eye Magazine, London.
 
John Walters will talk about the history and evolution of Eye, the international review of graphic design, since it was founded in 1990, and discuss some recent articles that led directly from academic research. From his perspective as both editor and writer he will look at the challenges of commissioning and publishing graphic design research, criticism and history.
John Walters is the co-owner (with Simon Esterson) and editor of graphic design magazine Eye. He also edits Pulp for Italian paper company Fedrigoni. Walters, originally a musician and record producer, co-founded creative music journal Unknown Public with Laurence Aston, and has written for The Independent, The Guardian, The Wire, Port and the BBC. He has programmed many Eye events, including ‘archive nights’ – in London, New York & Amsterdam – and ‘Critical Tensions’ and Eye’s regular ‘Type Tuesdays’ at St Bride Library and he is a Visiting Fellow of the University of the Arts London. Walters’ biography of Alan Kitching will be published in 2016.
 

Dr. Rathna Ramanathan 
Royal College of Art

Rathna Ramanathan is an international graphic design practitioner and researcher known for her expertise in intercultural communication design and typography, as well as non-mainstream and experimental publishing practices. Through her studio Minus9 Design, Rathna has worked with a range of clients from the BBC to World Bank. Her work has featured in numerous exhibitions and publications, and has received multiple international design awards, including, most recently, the ISTD Certificate of Excellence (2014) for In the Land of Punctuation. She is currently involved in the research and design of the 100-year publishing project, Murty Classical Library of India, published by Harvard University. She holds a PhD in Typography and Graphic Communication from Reading and an MA in Communication Design from Central Saint Martins.   
 

Prof. Timothy donaldson
Falmouth University 
 
Timothy Donaldson is a letterworker: a practising graphic designer, type designer and action calligrapher with enthusiasm for the use, abuse and reuse of text as a communication device. He is the author of Shapes for sounds, a widely available treatise on the past, present and future of the Latin alphabets. He has lectured on graphic design internationally since the mid 1990s and designed over 40 typefaces for Adobe, FontShop International, The International Typeface Corporation and Letraset.  He is well known for his ongoing experiments with tools and chirographic mark-making, particularly in large-scale performances which explore the convergences of group narratives, divergent orthographies, semiotics and action drawing. Tim continues to perform and lecture internationally, design typefaces and contribute to the global corpus of critical graphic design writing, and now teaches at Falmouth where he attempts to trace a meaningful path between the history, theory and practice of graphic design.
 
Tim is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts